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    Digital Component #6: Thesis

    Thesis: Throughout the text, Kramer and Sprenger support their argument that women are more likely to be witches by asserting that women are more susceptible to demonic influences, providing anecdotal evidence of the harm witches are able to inflict, exploiting male gender anxieties to enhance the believability of their claims, and establishing the credibility of their ideas about witchcraft by extensively citing church doctrine and the works of other Dominican clergy. Points of Argument 1. Kramer and Sprenger assert that women are more likely to be witches because of inherent characteristics that make them more prone to spiritual corruption 2. Kramer and Sprenger support their argument by using anecdotes from…

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    Digital Component #5: Visuals

    The image presented is the title page to a 1520 printing of the Malleus Maleficarum, purportedly the 7th edition, printed in Cologne, Germany. This image is significant because it represents a rare version of the text: even though the Malleus Maleficarum was published in 1487, early copies are incredibly hard to come by. The English translation of the page’s Latin subheading, provided by Wikimedia Commons, reads: “The Hammer of Witches which destroyeth Witches and their heresy like a most powerful spear.” While the name of the artists and typesetters of the title page are unknown, it is most likely that any artists or workers involved in the creation of this edition were hired…

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    Digital Component #4: Bibliographic Citations

    Broedel, Hans Peter. The Malleus Maleficarum and the Construction of Witchcraft: Theology and Popular Belief. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003. Brauner, Sigrid, and Robert H. Brown. Fearless Wives and Frightened Shrews: The Construction of the Witch in Early Modern Germany. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1995.   Roper, Lyndal.  The Witch in Western Imagination. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012.

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    Digital Component #3: Malleus Maleficarum Primary Source Transcription

    The Malleus Maleficarum was written by Dominican friar Heinrich Kramer, and published in Germany in 1487. This particular edition of the text was translated from the original Latin by American historian Christopher S. Mackey, and published in 2009 by the Cambridge University Press. Various English translations of the text can be found online in full, such as here, here, and here. The book has been kept in print since its publication, and various editions are available in libraries and archives around the world. Gender and religion are both prominent themes throughout the text. At the intersection of these themes, I will be using the text to examine the gender anxieties…

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    History Symposium

    When I attended the history symposium for the first time on Friday, I had few to no expectations. All I knew was that this was where students would be presenting the fruits of their labor from their senior seminars, without having any inkling of the mechanics of this. One of the things that surprised me the most was how similar the presentations were to the ones we gave in our 297 class. In a way, the presentations were less serious than I was expecting, with students having interesting visual in their backgrounds, and sliding jokes into their speeches. The presentation that stuck with me the most was probably the first…

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    Blog Post # 5: Oral Presentations

    Q: Thoughts, vibes, feelings about oral presentations? How do you prepare for oral presentations? Lessons learned from good presentations you’ve seen? Tips? Overall, I feel pretty good about the upcoming presentations. I’m glad and lucky that I’ve picked a topic that aligns so closely with my interests– it’s always easier to talk about things you feel passionately about. I feel like I have a strong grasp of the material, I’m very happy with the powerpoint I’ve prepared, I just need to practice my speech, and I should be good to go. One of the main problems I foresee is nerves. When I’m nervous, I tend to talk fast and gesture with…

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    Blog Post # 4: Academic Databases

    What academic databases do you find most helpful in your research? Challenging? Why? Strengths and weaknesses? Which ones do you think you should explore further? Currently, my favorite database to look for sources is JSTOR! I have the most experience with this one, and I’ve had good luck using it for papers. One of my main pet peeves is that UMW doesn’t always have access to certain documents or articles on JSTOR, and I end up checking around the web to see if I can get access to it some other way. Worldcat is one that I have not previously heard of, but I’m excited about being able to expand my academic…

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    Historical Themes

    One of the main themes I find interesting in history is to examine events through the lens of gender. The experiences of women throughout the ages, crossing centuries and countries and boundaries of language is, in my opinion, one of the most fascinating areas of study, and one that has been grossly understudied. This lens colors all of my interests, some of which are listed below, and how Last year, I took Dr. Poska’s European Women’s History class, and it was by far my favorite class I’ve taken in college thus far.  It helped to open my eyes to another historical narrative that is often forgotten or deliberately pushed to the…

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    Introductory Blog Post

    Hello, all! I’m Shawnya Peterson, junior History & English major. I’m so excited to get into the weeds of my history degree. For the intro blog post, I decided to take the opportunity to tell about myself just a bit. My first image was chosen to represent the fact that I love literature, and Shakespeare in particular, with Macbeth being my favorite play. It is closely tied with Romeo and Juliet, which is a good way to sum up the dueling sides of my personality/interests: light and emotional and romantic, versus somewhat “darker interests”, my favorite of which being true crime. The second image I chose because Shenandoah National Park…