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    Digital Component #6: Thesis

    Thesis: Throughout the text, Kramer and Sprenger support their argument that women are more likely to be witches by asserting that women are more susceptible to demonic influences, providing anecdotal evidence of the harm witches are able to inflict, exploiting male gender anxieties to enhance the believability of their claims, and establishing the credibility of their ideas about witchcraft by extensively citing church doctrine and the works of other Dominican clergy. Points of Argument 1. Kramer and Sprenger assert that women are more likely to be witches because of inherent characteristics that make them more prone to spiritual corruption 2. Kramer and Sprenger support their argument by using anecdotes from…

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    Digital Component #5: Visuals

    The image presented is the title page to a 1520 printing of the Malleus Maleficarum, purportedly the 7th edition, printed in Cologne, Germany. This image is significant because it represents a rare version of the text: even though the Malleus Maleficarum was published in 1487, early copies are incredibly hard to come by. The English translation of the page’s Latin subheading, provided by Wikimedia Commons, reads: “The Hammer of Witches which destroyeth Witches and their heresy like a most powerful spear.” While the name of the artists and typesetters of the title page are unknown, it is most likely that any artists or workers involved in the creation of this edition were hired…

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    Digital Component #4: Bibliographic Citations

    Broedel, Hans Peter. The Malleus Maleficarum and the Construction of Witchcraft: Theology and Popular Belief. Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2003. Brauner, Sigrid, and Robert H. Brown. Fearless Wives and Frightened Shrews: The Construction of the Witch in Early Modern Germany. Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1995.   Roper, Lyndal.  The Witch in Western Imagination. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2012.

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    Digital Component #3: Malleus Maleficarum Primary Source Transcription

    The Malleus Maleficarum was written by Dominican friar Heinrich Kramer, and published in Germany in 1487. This particular edition of the text was translated from the original Latin by American historian Christopher S. Mackey, and published in 2009 by the Cambridge University Press. Various English translations of the text can be found online in full, such as here, here, and here. The book has been kept in print since its publication, and various editions are available in libraries and archives around the world. Gender and religion are both prominent themes throughout the text. At the intersection of these themes, I will be using the text to examine the gender anxieties…